Understanding the virtue of thrift: A response to Joyce McMillan

Understanding the virtue of thrift: A response to Joyce McMillan

In Response to Joyce McMillan’s article “Debunking the Tory myth of the magic money tree”, first published in the Scotsman on 02/06/17.

 

Understanding the virtue of thrift: A response to Joyce McMillan

“If socialists understood economics, they would not be socialists.”
– Nobel prize-winning economist Friedrich Hayek.

 

Writing in Friday’s (02/06/17) Scotsman, Joyce McMillan asserts that any fiscal constraint by government (so-called “austerity”) is unnecessary, claiming that it has unleashed:

“…a litany of meanness and misery firmly based on the assumption that there is a finite amount of money in …

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Venezuela’s Killing Fields

Venezuela’s Killing Fields

The Khmer Rouge took power in Cambodia in 1975.(1) Their goal was one of turning the nation into one of an agrarian socialist society. As well as resetting the official date to “Year Zero”, they embarked upon a program of forced labour, evacuating the cities and sending the inhabitants to work in the fields. The demands – as in China’s great leap forward – were impossible to meet and the result was not an increase in production but a decrease. The shortage of food combined …

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Putting The Foot down: In defence of workplace dress codes.

Putting The Foot down: In defence of workplace dress codes.

Recently a  female employee of a temping agency was told to wear high heels to work. She refused, raising the issue on social media and creating a furore. Now the employee in question, Nicola Thorp, has launched a petition to have government outlaw such dress codes on the grounds that they are sexist.

At the risk of making a “straw-woman” of the case, the argument seems to be that wearing heels is painful and the requirement to wear them is only imposed for aesthetics reasons; reasons which …

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But Who Will Build The Roads????

But Who Will Build The Roads????

But who will build the roads?

 

The recent closure of the Forth Road Bridge (FRB) proves a useful catalyst for discussing the role of government in the provision of certain services. “Without government, who will build the roads?” is a commonly asked question by those who are sceptical of the power of the market to provide for them. It is perhaps understandable that this view is taken given the use that we all make of roads every day. After all, perhaps people envisage a system of …

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